• Pete Swan and Alan Boyle at 2014 Space Elevator Conference

    ISEC President Dr. Peter Swan (L) talks to NBC columnist Alan Boyle about the future of the Space Elevator during the 2014 Space Elevator Conference

  • Climber Finalists at 2014 Space Elevator Conference

    Climbers on the ribbon, ready for the Robotics Competition Finals during the 2014 Space Elevator Conference

  • Climber contestants at 2014 Space Elevator Conference

    Contestants working on their Climbers at the Robotics Competition during the 2014 Space Elevator Conference

  • Leonard David at 2014 Space Elevator Conference

    Science Author Leonard David delivering the Keynote Address at the 2014 Space Elevator Conference

  • Speech Contest Winners at 2014 Space Elevator Conference

    Elevator Speech contest winners Lana and Campbell Gorlinski standing in front of some of the attendees of the 2014 Space Elevator Conference

  • Skip Penny at 2014 Space Elevator Conference

    Robert "Skip" Penny, giving a status update of the Space Elevator Concept of Operations Report at the 2014 Space Elevator Conference

  • Shuichi Ohno at 2014 Space Elevator Conference

    Shuichi Ohno, president of the Japan Space Elevator Association, with a Climber they designed for the joint NASA-JAXA exhibition in Japan.  He brought this to display at the 2014 Space Elevator Conference.

ISEC annually selects a 'Theme' to focus its activities around for that year. One of the yearly activities of ISEC is to commission a Report based on the annual study focusing on the ISEC Theme. Each report is not intended to break new ground but is, instead, designed to provide a broad, definitive and current look at the topic in question. It's also intended to counteract some of the misinformation that is so prevalent about the Space Elevator.

This ISEC Study can be conducted among the auspices of any ISEC’s activities, depending on the topic. If it is Technical in nature, it falls into the purview of the technical leads.

Each ISEC Report is directed by a Report Team Lead. This person is selected by the ISEC Board of Directors and responsible for the year long study, to include: assemble a team, research the available literature, analyze the information, and prepare the report. Once the preliminary Report is completed, it is sent out to a broad list of people (including attendees at the International Space Elevator Conference) for comments. These comments are then incorporated, as appropriate, into the report and then a more formal review process takes place. The reports from each of the studies based upon yearly themes are:

2016 - Design Considerations for the Space Elevator GEO Node, Apex Anchor and a Communications Architecture 

Team Lead: Mr. Skip Penny

Team Members: Michael “Fitzer” Fitzgerald, Robert "Skip" Penny, Dr. Peter Swan, Peter Glaskowsky, Dr. Paul Phister, Vern Hall, Ron Cole, David Ackerman, Dennis Wright and Chris Malek.

This 2016 study report was kicked off in September 2015 to establish a baseline for designing the Apex Anchor and the GEO Node. In addition, a communications architecture for the space elevator will be sketched out. The summary is as follows:

This 2016 ISEC study addresses three critical aspects of the space elevator infrastructure: The Geo Node, the Apex Anchor and how the two will communicate with the rest of the space elevator. The key question to ask at the present is: What are the functional needs of the space elevator that will drive the design of the segments. During this study, the team will assess many issues dealing with two nodes in deep space to include:

  • What is an Apex Anchor? Describe in detail the major sub-systems.
    • What are the functional elements of the Apex Anchor?
    • What are the missions of the Apex Anchor?
  • What is a GEO Node? Describe in detail the major sub-systems.
    • What are the functional elements of the GEO Node?
    • What are the missions of the GEO Node?
  • What is a Comm Architecture? Describe in detail the sub-systems.
    • What are the missions for the Comm Architecture?

This report will be available from the ISEC store or directly from the publisher, Lulu.com [after publication in March 2017].

2015 – Design Considerations of a Space Elevator Earth Port

Team Lead: Mr. Vern Hall

Team Members: Michael “Fitzer” Fitzgerald, Robert "Skip" Penny, Dr. Peter Swan, Dr. John Knapman, and Dr. Cathy Swan

This 2015 study report will be kicked off in September 2014 to establish a baseline for designing the Marine Node. The summary is as follows:

This 2015 ISEC study addresses a critical aspect of the space elevator infrastructure: the Marine Node. The key question to ask at the present is: What are the functional needs of the space elevator that will drive the design of a Marine Node. During this study, the team will assess many issues dealing with a floating platform in the middle of the Pacific to include:

  1. What are the set of requirements from the space elevator reference of its interface between the tether and the Marine Node?
  2. What type of infrastructure is required for the Marine Node?
  • Location stability
  • Weather support
  • Safety of flight and ocean operations
  • Support for how many personnel [food, water, sleeping]
  • How much through-put is expected per space elevator
  • How does it support maintenance and logistics
  • Communications needs
  • Baseline still? 1000 km west of Galapagos on Equator [4 deg south?]
  • An electronic .pdf of this report can be downloaded here: 

    Printed copies of this report can be purchased from the ISEC store or directly from the publisher, Lulu.com.
    An electronic version can be downloaded here: 2015 ISEC Space Elevator Earth Port

    2014 – Space Elevator Architectures and Roadmaps

    Team Lead: Michael “Fitzer” Fitzgerald

    Team Members: Dr. Peter Swan, Robert "Skip" Penny and Dr. Cathy Swan

    This 2014 study report establishes a baseline roadmap for designing space elevators for the future.

    This study addresses critical aspects of space elevator infrastructures: basic architectures and how we will get there with a roadmap. The roadmaps will leverage desired paths to lower risks and identify approaches for pulling together the diverse concepts. The three architectures in the literature today are solid looks at various approaches, while not providing that key element of “how will we get there?” Each path from today to the successful implementation of a space elevator infrastructure must be identified and discussed with respect to hurdles and milestones. The study has three architectures being compared:

    1. Dr. Edwards baseline architecture [2002]
    2. International Academy of Astronuatics architecture [2013]
    3. Obayashi Corporation architecture [2014]

    Printed copies of this report can be purchased from the ISEC store or directly from the publisher, Lulu.com.
    An electronic version can be downloaded here: 2014 ISEC Space Elevator Architecture and Roadmap

    2013 – Design Considerations on Space Elevator Tether Climber

    Team Lead: Dr. Peter Swan

    Team Members: Dr. Peter Swan, Dr. Peter Glaskowsky, Dr. John Knapman, Robert "Skip" Penny and Dr. Cathy Swan

    This 2013 study report establishes a baseline for designing the climbers. The summary is as follows:

    "The 2013 ISEC study report addresses a critical aspect of the space elevator infrastructure: the tether climber. The tether climber will leverage 60 years of spacecraft design while incorporating aspects of traditional terrestrial transportation infrastructure..."

    The study is organized as follows:

    1. Chapter 1: Introduction
    2. Chapter 2: Tether Climber Operational Phases
    3. Chapter 3: Sub-System Description
    4. Chapter 4: Power Sources
    5. Chapter 5: Conclusions and Recommendations
    Printed copies of this report can be purchased from the ISEC store or directly from the publisher, Lulu.com.
    An electronic version can be downloaded here: 2013 ISEC Design Considerations for Space Elevator Tether Climbers  
    2012 - Space Elevator Concept of Operations

    Team Lead: Robert (Skip) Penny

    Team Members: Dr. Peter Swan, Robert (Skip) Penny and Dr. Cathy Swan

    From the Preface:

    This study report presents the current thinking on how a fully developed commercial space elevator will operate. It draws on the experiences of the study participants and the authors who have over eleven decades of major space system acquisitions and operations experience. While the development of Space Elevator tethers and climbers is a daunting task, their operation will leverage 50 years of satellite operations experience. The climber is essentially a satellite just like the thousands that have been launched to date. The authors conclude:

    Operations for a Space Elevator

    • Have No Showstoppers
    • Have Reasonable Costs
    • Meets the Challenge

    Printed copies of this report can be purchased from the ISEC store or directly from the publisher, Lulu.com.

    An electronic version can be downloaded here: 2012 ISEC Space Elevator Concept of Operations 

    2010 - Space Debris Mitigation - Space Elevator Survivability

    Team lead: Dr. Peter Swan

    Team members: Dr. Peter Swan, Robert "Skip" Penny and Cathy Swan

    From the Preface:

    Will space debris be a “show stopper” for the development of the Space Elevator Infrastructure?

    The answer is a resounding NO!

    The elimination of the space debris risk with reasonable probabilities of impact is an engineering problem. The proposed mitigation concepts change the issue from a perceived problem to a concern; but, by no means is it a significant threat. This pamphlet illustrates how the development office for a future space elevator infrastructure can attack this problem and convert it into another solvable engineering issue.

    Printed copies of this report can be purchased from the ISEC store or directly from the publisher, Lulu.com.
    An electronic version can be downloaded here: 2010 ISEC Space Debris Final Report

    Site Search

    ISEC Study Reports

    Direct links to all ISEC generated Study Reports can be found below.

    More detailed page is: ISEC Space Elevator Reports for Download

    2016 - Design Considerations for the Space Elevator: GEO Node, Apex Anchor and a Communications Architecture

    This report will be available from the ISEC web site, ISEC store, or directly from the publisher, Lulu.com [after publication in March 2017].

    2015 ISEC Space Elevator Earth Port

    2014 ISEC Space Elevator Architecture and Roadmap

    2013 ISEC Design Considerations for Space Elevator Tether Climbers

    2012 ISEC Space Elevator Concept of Operations

    2010 ISEC Space Debris Final Report

    CLIMB - The Space Elevator Journal

    Download .pdf copies of the CLIMB, the Space Elevator Journal:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Via Ad Astra Magazine

    Download .pdf copies of the Via Ad Astra magazine:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Calendar

    No upcoming events at this time.

    Space Elevator Research

    There is a lot of activity in Space Elevator Research:

    Space Elevator Research Workshop

    ISEC Research Committee

    Updated Space Elevator Publications on NSS.org!

     Studies: Chair – Dennis Wright 

     2010    Space Debris: Skip Penny, Peter Swan, Cathy Swan

     2011    Search for 30 MYuri:  Bryan Laubscher

     2012    Ops Concept: Skip Penny, Peter Swan, Cathy Swan

     2013    Tether Climbers:  Peter Swan, Skip Penny, Peter Glaskowsky, John Knapman, Cathy Swan

     2014    Architectures:  Fitzer Fitzgerald, Skip Penny, Cathy Swan, Peter Swan

     2015    Earth Port:     Vern Hall, Skip Penny, Sandee Schaeffer, Peter Glaskowsky

     2016    GEO/AA/Comm’s:     Paul Phister, Fitzer Fitzgerald, Vern Hall, Skip Penny, Peter Swan, Peter Glaskowsky, Ron Cole, David Ackerman, Chris Malek

     2017    Design Considerations for Space Elevator Simulation

     

    ISEC Newsletters

    Most recent ISEC Space Elevator email newsletters:

    2016

    Click for more ISEC Space Elevator Newsletters.

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    "The ISEC promotes the development, construction and operation of a Space Elevator (SE) Infrastructure as a revolutionary and efficient way to space for all humanity."

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